Non-Traditional Performance Opportunities

One of my goals in teaching piano is to help my students integrate music making with everyday life. When students realize that they can play their instrument for more than just an annual recital or formal concert, lessons become more meaningful. More meaningful lessons means more dedicated students!

As music educators we realize that music is everywhere. Our students, however, may not be consciously aware of this fact. It is up to us to help them notice music that is in their everyday lives. One way we can do this is to seek out non-traditional performance opportunities for our students. One of the best ways to do this is to consider the other activities in which the students participate. For instance, I have several piano students who are also studying dance. Dance classes are perfect performance opportunities for piano players! Who says dancers have to use pre-recorded music?

The picture above shows one of my students (in this instance, my daughter) accompanying at a dance class. This was a great opportunity to gain experience working with other kids in the arts. The fact that the dancers were friends of hers was also very encouraging and it made it seem more like “play” than performance or practice. (Isn’t that what music making should be?)

From a piano pedagogy standpoint, the piano student who accompanies dance classes can gain a deeper understanding of rhythm and the need to keep a steady beat. Watching and being aware of the dancers’ movements also helps the student feel the pulse of the music. What about helping with expression? Yes, of course! Having someone dance to the music as a student plays can help the student play more expressively and improves phrasing. These things are possible because suddenly the music has a purpose beyond the physical acts involved in playing the instrument.

An added bonus for this non-traditional performance opportunity is the student’s interaction with the dance instructor. In this type of situation the student must be able to receive direction from a teacher other than the piano teacher. This is so important for helping the student broaden his or her idea of what it means to take piano lessons. Sometimes students place their lessons in a box where they only use their skills for their piano teacher. Playing for a teacher in a different area of the arts forces the student to become the expert concerning the music they are playing. They must use the knowledge that they have about their instrument and apply to what the dance teacher is asking them to do. This translates into higher levels of confidence which of course makes better performances possible.

Finally, an added benefit of this non-traditional performance opportunity was that some of the dancers became interested in playing the piano!

If you teach music or have a child who takes dance classes, I would highly recommend you speak with a dance teacher in your area about the possibility of your students accompanying for the dance class. Accompanying for the warm up section of the dance class can be a great way to start.

What are some other non-traditional performance opportunities that you offer your students?

10 thoughts on “Non-Traditional Performance Opportunities

  1. Fun idea and a great experience for students to do this! They may be surprised how challenging it can actually be and how much you really have to work together to be successful.
    (BTW- both links didn’t work. ie: Playing names in the stone… and the dance link)

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    • Thanks so much Jennifer! Hey – Working Together – another life skill we can add to the list of things kids learn from music instruction!

      Thanks for the heads up about the links. They should be working now.

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  2. Pingback: Non-Traditional Performance Opportunities | Reigning Victory Dance Studio, Inc

  3. This sounds great! I like to play games with my students that transfer over to little things in daily life, so that they might be walking to school one day and see/hear something that reminds them that music is everywhere. πŸ™‚

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    • Thanks, Grace. Love your thought about being mindful of music when walking to school! Another thing I like to do is assign students 30 minutes of “watching TV” with their back turned toward the TV. While they are “watching TV” this way, they tally how many times they hear music being played. This extends to show different ways musicians make money.

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  4. Pingback: Boring Piano Recitals | LaDona's Music Studio

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